Is Your Team on PACE?

Hiring is a good Thing

Needing to hire new people is a good thing.  It means that your business is growing, or at least changing.   In a perfect world, you get to hand-pick your new employees knowing everything about them before they even walk through the door for their interview.

Coaching help build a positive attitude

But you don’t.  So it’s important to consider key factors when going through the interview process. We use an acronym PACE™ with our clients:  Positive + Attitude + Crew, = Excellence.  Now is an excellent time for a quick examination of these interrelated concepts.

Positive:  Interview specifically looking for the person who will most positively embrace your core values.  Quite possibly this may not be the one who has the best resume or GPA.  Remember that having someone on your team who cares about the things you do is a far more desirable factor.

The importance of having your team on the same page cannot be stressed enough.  It is what keeps you all working towards the company goals.  That concept should be in the forefront as you conduct your interview.   You need someone who embraces your values; it cannot be taught, either they have it or they don’t.  Finding that positive person will have a positive effect on your company.

Attitude:  Attitude is another quality you need to evaluate during an interview.  It refers to how your candidate shows their opinions or outlook through behavior. How does this person listen and react to things you are saying?  Do they have any insight into the position for which they are applying?  Consider things like their temperament and level of common sense.

Crew:  How and where will this person fit in with your existing team?  If you have more than one candidate, bring them together for the interview.  You will learn a lot about a person when you see how they interact with others, particularly those who are vying for the same position.  Listen to what they say and how they treat each other, this is a great way to find out how they’ll interact with your Crew.

Excellence:  Workplace excellence is an obvious goal yet one that deserves a mention.  Projecting your expectation of excellence during the interview will resonate with your future employees.  This is not just at the personal level, but at your measurable company level. They will know they are entering a well-oiled machine that has tools in place to monitor and correct on a weekly, quarterly and yearly basis.

You need people who are on board from the very beginning, people who are with you for the long haul.  Remember PACE = Positive + Attitude + Crew = Excellence for your company and in your culture.  PACE is at the heart of our 4-hour hiring process; want to learn more contact us today!

If you would like to have a Review Session of your Culture and Team with coach Thom Torode, click here to schedule.

Thom Torode is a NJ based Professional Executive & Business Coach and EOS Implementer. Having owned and operated over 5 different businesses he is currently the Managing Director for Sunrise Business Advisors.   Thom’s expertise includes working with those business owners who have plateaued getting them unstuck and back in growth mode. Additionally, Thom works with both franchisees and franchisors in helping them develop their leadership. Thom is also Director Consultant with BNI. When not helping business owners and their teams create the business and lives they want and need, he can be found following his kids activities.

Is Your Franchise Flying Blind?

EOS Issues

How to Recognize and Address Your Core Business Issues.

Over the past several months we have highlighted the various components within the Entrepreneurial Operating System (EOS).

  1. Vision
  2. People
  3. Issues
  4. Data
  5. Process
  6. Traction

While each of the 6 components of the EOS Model is a separate entity, they inherently interact with each other in some capacity.  Each individual component needs to be solidly identified if the EOS is going to help the company’s health and growth.

For example, while most companies think that the Issues they are having are unique, in actuality there are only about 25 different Issues that companies have faced since the beginning of time.

Issues: IDS

Let’s examine one company in the news lately that lost close to $1 billion in the market because they failed to handle an Issue properly.  The company in question is, of course, United Airlines.  My purpose is not to get into a debate of the legalities (or illegalities) of what happened, but to merely show you how important it is to go through your own IDS (Identify – Discuss – Solve) for any Issues you might have. Let’s start with what happened within United’s chain of command that broke down so horrifically into a continuing PR nightmare.

From United’s website:  “We are committed to providing a level of service to our customers that makes us a leader in the airline industry. We understand that to do this we need to have a product we are proud of and employees who like coming to work every day.

Our goal is to make every flight a positive experience for our customers. Our United Customer Commitment explains our specific service commitments so that we can continue a high level of performance and improve wherever possible. The commitment explains our policies in a clear, consistent and understandable fashion. We have detailed training programs and system enhancements to support our employees in meeting these commitments, and we measure how well we meet them.”

 

Very interesting…so what happened, what’s the Issue?  From what I’ve read in the various media posts, someone realized that they needed to get 4 crew members to Louisville for the next day.  They had a Process for this, eventually randomly selecting passengers to “volunteer” their seats. It’s still inconclusive as to if that Process called for having police “enforce” that policy.

Part of the process of identifying the key Issue here is to ask a few questions:

  1. Why a PR nightmare?
  2. What happened & What could have been done better to resole this Issue?
  3. Solution:  Analytical tools, Process modification, People

From our February e-newsletter on issues, “Only when the real root Issue is identified should you and your team begin the discussion phase.” What is the real Issue that United is facing?  I’ll suggest a few, but this list is by no means conclusive.

  1. Too much concern for the bottom line that Wall Street requires (Data component)
  2. Too little concern for their paying customers (a direct conflict with their Vision)
  3. Faulty Process
  4. Process driving People, rather than People driving Process

Hopefully, Oscar Munoz, the CEO of United is going to give more than lip service when he states his apology for ‘re-accommodating’ passengers. What happens over the next few weeks will be telling as to how seriously United takes this Issue.

What types of Issues are you facing within your company?  If you would like to have  an Issue Review Session with coach Thom Torode, click here to schedule.

Thom Torode is a NJ based Professional Executive & Business Coach and EOS Implementer. Having owned and operated over 5 different businesses he is currently the Managing Director for Sunrise Business Advisors.   Thom’s expertise includes working with those business owners who have plateaued getting them unstuck and back in growth mode. Additionally, Thom works with both franchisees and franchisors in helping them develop their leadership. Thom is also Director Consultant with BNI. When not helping business owners and their teams create the business and lives they want and need, he can be found following his kids activities.

 

Full Speed Ahead with Yes for 2014

Full Speed Ahead  with Yes for 2014

Would you like to start next year with more yes’s?  Full Speed Ahead with Yes for 2014.  With 2014 just around the corner imagine and visualize what this year would have been like if all you did was change your wording slightly?

Full Steam Ahead with YES for 2014

Full Steam Ahead with YES for 2014

Nothing zaps a great idea faster than “Yes, but….” You might as well say “No.”

It’s not just about semantics. In fact, “Yes, but” may be the No. 1 phrase for killing personal hope, putting great ideas on ice and threatening innovation in organizations.

Take Jonah, for example. Jonah is a senior manager in the real estate division of a large financial services company when he learns of an open position in the company’s prestigious new-product research team. He’s been successful in the real estate division, but never really fulfilled. What he really loves is the charge he gets brainstorming new ideas and researching their viability.

Jonah is excited to apply for the position—initially, then during a conversation with a friend, he says, “Yeah, I’d be great for that team, but you have to know someone to get named.” After the call, he finds himself increasingly discouraged.

Will he get the position? At this rate, he won’t even apply.

Luckily, Jonah’s coach points out his self-defeating self-talk and suggests a simple fix.

“Yeah,” Jonah says again, “I’d be great, and it’s hard to get on the new-products team if you don’t know someone, but I’m going to give it a shot.” Catching himself again, he says, “And I’m going to give it a shot.”

He works hard on his résumé, even proposes a potential product line for the team to consider, and shows up impeccably for his interview. Jonah doesn’t get the position, and that’s okay because in the process he’s become clearer about his career goals. He’s inspired to take some classes and to develop his network of contacts, thus making his success more likely in the future.

And Thinking

And is powerful. And unites opposites, opens up opportunity, creates possibilities that weren’t evident before. Couple and with yes, and you have a winning combination. Here are a few more examples.

 Yes, and opens up possibility.

Yes, I wake up many mornings with ideas for new inventions, but I’m an accountant. I can’t quit my job.

Yes, I have lots of ideas for inventions, and as an accountant I’ve handled my money well. Next month I’m building a prototype of my most promising idea.

Yes, and invites cooperation.

Yes, I’d love to telecommute, but my boss doesn’t trust anyone and would never go for it.

Yes, I’d love to work from home, and my boss has trouble trusting his employees. I’ll develop a proposal showing him the benefits of telecommuting and suggest that we try it for a month.

Yes, and encourages creativity.

Yeah, I’d love to live here, but you have to be rich to buy a house in this market.

Yeah, I want to live here, and the market is challenging. So I’m seeking unconventional opportunities as I improve my finances.

Try it on. Every time you hear yourself say, “Yes, but,” change it to “yes, and.” In that moment, you’re breaking the habit of closed thinking. The more you do it, the more open your thinking will become. As with any habit, it takes time to break. And it’s worth it.

Full Speed Ahead with YES for 2014! Be stronger for leadership Morris.

iStock_000017440933Small YES

To your success,

Thom

Sunrise Business Advisors is a Morris County based coaching, mentoring and leadership development firm.  They are also licensed facilitator for Elevate Your Leaders.  They may be reached at 862-219-6890

Thom Torode is also an expert executive coach listed on Pazoo.  For more information and to view some of Thom’s other articles go to: http://www.pazoo.com/expert/ttorode/

Author’s content used under license, © 2008 Claire Communications

Does Your Business Need a Laugh Break 2?

Does Your Business Need a Laugh Break 2?

Thom Torode, MBA (2of 3)

In part 1 we talked about the importance of having laugh breaks.

Still, for too many, the prevailing attitude is that one cannot be “professional” and have fun at the same time. The office motto has become the athlete’s: No pain, no gain. If you’re laughing, then you’re not working.

Right

Laugh Break

 Consider these:

  • The Harvard Business Review (September 2003) reported that executives with a sense of humor climb the corporate ladder more quickly and earn more money than their counterparts.
  • University of Wisconsin professor Stu Robertshaw cites one corporate study in which the firm experienced a 21 percent decrease in staff turnover and a 38 percent decrease in Friday absenteeism after incorporating humor into the workplace.
  • Robert Half International, an executive recruitment firm, surveyed 1,000 executives and found that 84 percent felt that workers with a sense of humor do a better job.
  • In a study, David Abramis of California State University determined that employees who have fun on the job are more productive, more creative, are better decision-makers and team players—and have fewer absentee, sick and late days.
  • An often-cited survey of 737 corporate CEOs by Hodge-Cronin & Associates found that 98% said they prefer to hire someone with a sense of humor to someone without.

Injecting humor in the workplace is not about turning your organization into a comedy club. It’s not about entertaining others or being able to tell a joke. It’s not about pranks, practical jokes or juvenile antics. Instead, it’s more of an attitude, a way of viewing and processing things.

Thanks for reading Laugh Break 2, look for pt 3 on some additional benefits.  In the mean time check out this page for your own laugh break 2 of the day.

17929491_ml (2)Sunrise Business Advisors is a Morris County based coaching, mentoring and leadership development firm.  They are also licensed facilitators for Elevate Your Leaders.  They may be reached at 862-219-6890

Stress Less Communication at Work – Success in 5.5 Steps!

What would your work day be like if you had Stress Less Communication at work? 

Think about this scenario:

You’re in the break room with a colleague, when he looks over and asks, “Do you always butter your bread that way?”

Ha, ha, you laugh. But inside, your story is going like this: Who does he think he is, Mr. Manners? What’s wrong with the way I butter my bread? Jerk. He’s always so critical.

learn to be stress-less

Freeze frame.

If something as minor as buttering bread can provoke such feelings of defensiveness, imagine what can happen with more important issues at work.

What happens, says Sharon Ellison, M.S., is essentially war. Ellison, founder of Powerful Non-Defensive Communication, teaches that the way we communicate with each other uses the same principles and tactics we would use in physical combat, based on the belief that we must protect ourselves by being defensive. As soon as we feel any threat, either of not getting what we want or of being harmed or put down in some way, we choose from among the three basic defensive war maneuvers: surrender, withdrawal or counterattack.

Stress Less communicaiton at work

The myth, says Ellison, is that defensiveness will protect us, that to be open is to be vulnerable and weak. On the contrary, it is being defensive that weakens us. If the people you work with can’t rely upon your keen assessment of your role in a given situation they won’t trust you as much.

In a corporate setting, defensiveness can result in power struggles and unnecessary, destructive conflicts. And if you are defensive with customers and clients, you are more likely to lose them.

While you’re busy defending yourself, there’s also not much room for meaningful contact with others. Nor can you learn from their feedback or from your own mistakes. Your defensiveness hurts you the most.

Despite clear advantages to non-defensiveness, the opposite is pervasive. Ellison estimates that we use 95% of our communications energy being defensive. She describes the six most common defensive reactions as follows:

Surrender-Betray. We give in but defend the person’s mistreatment of us, taking the blame ourselves.

Surrender-Sabotage. We cooperate outwardly but undermine the person in some way. Passive-aggressive behavior falls into this category.

Withdrawal-Escape. We avoid talking to someone by not answering, leaving the room or changing the subject.

Withdrawal-Entrap. We refuse to give information as a way to trap the other person into doing something inappropriate or making a mistake.

Counterattack-Justify. We let someone know she is wrong to be upset with us, explaining our own behavior and making excuses.

Counterattack-Blame. We attack or judge the other to defend ourselves.

To curb your own defensive reactions, consider these 5.5 steps to Stress Less Communication.

  1. If you feel criticized, rather than reacting or retreating, take a deep breath, tell yourself that it’s only feedback and just listen. You can correct the record later, if necessary.
  2. Consider if there is a kernel of truth in the criticism. If there is, acknowledge it and work to improve in that area. Your willingness to acknowledge when you’re wrong inspires colleagues, clients and management to feel confident in you.
  3. Realize that sometimes people’s criticisms are all about the “story” they have made up around a situation. Try not to take it personally or as your responsibility.
  4. When someone uses the words “always” and “never,” ignore those words and focus instead on the rest of the message.
  5. Listen for the (usually) hidden need expressed in a person’s complaint or anger, acknowledge the need, and then see whether there is something you can do to meet it. For instance, when a customer is complaining about your “defective” product, what he may need is to feel stable and secure, in this instance, to be able to rely upon your product. Address that need in a clear and compassionate manner and you regain not only his confidence, but his loyalty as well.

5.5 Call us for your leadership communication assessment for Stress Less Communication at work, NOW!

Changing how we communicate as individuals—learning that we can protect ourselves and have greater influence without using defensiveness—can not only dramatically shift our professional and personal relationships, but can also improve the bottom line.

Stress Less Communication at Work

Thom Torode is a professionally certified business and executive coach, he has also earned his MBA and has been the owner of over 5 business.  He is currently the managing director for Sunrise Capital Group, LLC and Inspirance, LLC.  We specialize in helping organization have stress-less communication. Additionally, Thom and his partner Jeff are co-principals for Actuate Performance a licensee for Elevate Your Leaders.  They are currently interviewing high performance managers for their next 12 month program. 

Call them at 862-219-6890 for an interview.

www.SunriseBusinessAdvisors.com

Author’s content used under license, © 2011 Claire Communications