Full Speed Ahead with Yes for 2014

Full Speed Ahead  with Yes for 2014

Would you like to start next year with more yes’s?  Full Speed Ahead with Yes for 2014.  With 2014 just around the corner imagine and visualize what this year would have been like if all you did was change your wording slightly?

Full Steam Ahead with YES for 2014

Full Steam Ahead with YES for 2014

Nothing zaps a great idea faster than “Yes, but….” You might as well say “No.”

It’s not just about semantics. In fact, “Yes, but” may be the No. 1 phrase for killing personal hope, putting great ideas on ice and threatening innovation in organizations.

Take Jonah, for example. Jonah is a senior manager in the real estate division of a large financial services company when he learns of an open position in the company’s prestigious new-product research team. He’s been successful in the real estate division, but never really fulfilled. What he really loves is the charge he gets brainstorming new ideas and researching their viability.

Jonah is excited to apply for the position—initially, then during a conversation with a friend, he says, “Yeah, I’d be great for that team, but you have to know someone to get named.” After the call, he finds himself increasingly discouraged.

Will he get the position? At this rate, he won’t even apply.

Luckily, Jonah’s coach points out his self-defeating self-talk and suggests a simple fix.

“Yeah,” Jonah says again, “I’d be great, and it’s hard to get on the new-products team if you don’t know someone, but I’m going to give it a shot.” Catching himself again, he says, “And I’m going to give it a shot.”

He works hard on his résumé, even proposes a potential product line for the team to consider, and shows up impeccably for his interview. Jonah doesn’t get the position, and that’s okay because in the process he’s become clearer about his career goals. He’s inspired to take some classes and to develop his network of contacts, thus making his success more likely in the future.

And Thinking

And is powerful. And unites opposites, opens up opportunity, creates possibilities that weren’t evident before. Couple and with yes, and you have a winning combination. Here are a few more examples.

 Yes, and opens up possibility.

Yes, I wake up many mornings with ideas for new inventions, but I’m an accountant. I can’t quit my job.

Yes, I have lots of ideas for inventions, and as an accountant I’ve handled my money well. Next month I’m building a prototype of my most promising idea.

Yes, and invites cooperation.

Yes, I’d love to telecommute, but my boss doesn’t trust anyone and would never go for it.

Yes, I’d love to work from home, and my boss has trouble trusting his employees. I’ll develop a proposal showing him the benefits of telecommuting and suggest that we try it for a month.

Yes, and encourages creativity.

Yeah, I’d love to live here, but you have to be rich to buy a house in this market.

Yeah, I want to live here, and the market is challenging. So I’m seeking unconventional opportunities as I improve my finances.

Try it on. Every time you hear yourself say, “Yes, but,” change it to “yes, and.” In that moment, you’re breaking the habit of closed thinking. The more you do it, the more open your thinking will become. As with any habit, it takes time to break. And it’s worth it.

Full Speed Ahead with YES for 2014! Be stronger for leadership Morris.

iStock_000017440933Small YES

To your success,

Thom

Sunrise Business Advisors is a Morris County based coaching, mentoring and leadership development firm.  They are also licensed facilitator for Elevate Your Leaders.  They may be reached at 862-219-6890

Thom Torode is also an expert executive coach listed on Pazoo.  For more information and to view some of Thom’s other articles go to: http://www.pazoo.com/expert/ttorode/

Author’s content used under license, © 2008 Claire Communications

Does Your Business Need a Laugh Break Pt 3

Laugh Break

Laugh Break

In Part 1 & 2 of Does your Business Need a Laugh Break we talked about the benefits a good laugh can bring to your business.  Now let’s take a look at the ancillary benefits then give you those 7.5 Ways for Bringing More Humor Into Your Business Life.

Consider these three areas Stronger Connections, Happier Workers, Creative Problem Solvers:

Stronger Connections

Laugh breaks tear down barriers, builds relationships and allows for better communication among coworkers. People with a sense of humor often have the ability to deal effectively with people and work issues; they are able to keep the severity of problems in perspective.

Humor also enhances motivation, collaboration and team-building, quickly creating a climate in which people feel motivated, energized and ready to contribute. You could say that the group that plays together stays together.

Happier Workers

Laugh breaks reduces workplace stress, and breaks up boredom and fatigue. Happier, more relaxed workers are able to better focus on tasks, make fewer errors in their work and produce more. They also stick around longer, are absent less and don’t burn out.

Humor also helps to minimize resistance to change. It is a good weapon to defend against the stress of reorganizing, downsizing, outsourcing and other negative trends in today’s workplace.

Creative Problem-Solvers

Humor unleashes much-desired creativity and divergent problem-solving. For example, good jokes guide us down one path only to suddenly track us onto another with the punch line. This breaks the mind set of our thinking and leads to increased creativity.

The bottom line: All work and no play isn’t even good for work.

 7.5 Ways for Bringing More Humor Into Your Business Life

(How to have a Laugh Break)

Attention all executives and managers: Lead the humor parade. Fun and laughter affects attitudes. And once you affect attitudes, you can unleash a new level of productivity and commitment in your organization (or in yourself). But where do you start? Following are just a few suggestions to get your own creative humor juices flowing:

1)     Figure out your humor profile. Listen to yourself for a few days and see what makes you laugh out loud (and be honest!). Have your coworkers or staff do the same.

2)     Make it a point to look for humor. The more you do, the more you’ll find (and receive!). Try looking at things from an out-of-the-ordinary perspective.

3)     Collect humor. Using your humor profile, start a funny file, collecting cartoons, jokes, comic strips and stories from newspapers, magazines and friends. Set aside a portion of your office or desk or wall as a “humor corner.”

4)     Encourage laughter in your department. Establish a humor bulletin board, keep a prop box, play simple games on a regular basis, gather a “fun committee,” encourage humor breaks.

5)     Laugh at yourself. One of the characteristics of effective leaders is the ability to laugh at themselves when things they try don’t work. Without that, people view them as critical.

6)     Use humor in the course of normal business. Add humor to presentations, performance evaluations, meetings, in memos, newsletters and emails, and at parties and recognition events.

7)     Keep the humor appropriate for the office. Never poke fun at anyone in a subordinate position in the organization and be careful not to offend others with humor that deprecates anyone’s beliefs or backgrounds. There is plenty of wonderful, clean humor out there.

7.5)  Every night at dinner, make family members share one funny or even             embarrassing  moment of their day.

laugh

Sunrise Business Advisors is a Morris County based coaching, mentoring and leadership development firm.  They are also licensed facilitators for Elevate Your Leaders.  They may be reached at 862-219-6890

Author’s content used under license, © 2008 Claire Communications